Picture credit: swanthinks.wordpress.com

It was one of those mornings. I thought I was doing great on time and then I looked at the clock..Today was the day for presentations in my 10:30am class. Even though I was not giving my presentation this day, I should not be late out of respect. Rushing to the classroom door I and three other students reached for the door to find out it was locked. The small yellow sticky note said, “email me that you’re here”. A classmate emailed our teacher all our names. After two presentations went by we realized the door was not going to be unlocked until after class was over.

Just like any public relations student, we decided to still get credit for participating. In Comm 4633, participating means tweeting at least three tweets per presentation. Sitting on the floor, with our ears against the door we listened and tweeted from the other side of the door.

The entire class uses the same hash tag #comm4633 with every tweet during the presentations. Using the same hash tag creates a flow. A live twitter chat. A live twitter chat for credit? Yes indeed. We were paying attention to our fellow class  mates. Listening and then tweeting the presenters quotes allows the words to stick on our minds.

I learned that even on the other side of the door, I could interact with my fellow class mates and receive participation credit. All because us public relations students did not let a door get in our way.

My professor actually was not mad that we were late and got a kick out of our tweeting from outside the classroom. We encouraged our professor to look back at our tweets. When the students inside the class realized we were outside tweeting they would give us heads up and tell us the next presenters name and twitter name.

I would like to know why more professors are not using this free, educational, and enjoyable way of learning? Students and professors receive a win win. Oh and fellow bloggers, if you do not have a twitter account then make one. Don’t knock it until you try it, you may actually like it.

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